AP Contract

Please review the following document with your parent.  I will provide you with a hard copy in class Wednesday and will need it signed and returned by Friday’s class.

AP Contract

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Social Justice Project- Section One: PEOPLE

The Kalief Browder Story

Civil Rights

Fred Hampton

Huey Newton

John Sinclair

Medgar Evers

Abbie Hoffman

Students for a Democratic Society

The Chicago 7

Eldridge Cleaver

The Weatherman Underground

Hosea Williams

Muhammad Ali

Cesar Chavez

Harvey Milk

James Baldwin

Angela Davis

Nina Simone

Paul Robeson

Stokely Carmichael

Dolores Huerta

Lena Horne

Lucy Stone

Human Rights

Jello Biafra

Zack de la Rocha

Allen Ginsberg

Richard Alpert

Ken Kesey

Hillary Clinton

Alan Lomax

Joan Chandos Baez

Yuri Orlov

Loraine Hansberry

Geronimo Pratt

Ophelia Dahl

Ronan Farrow

Lilian Wald

Jacob M. Appel

Malcolm X

Juliette Binoche

Barack Obama

Coretta Scott King

Adam Yauch

Laurie Holden

Preview Week 10: 10/9 – 10/13

What are the students learning?

In this unit, students will:

-Analyze and interpret good writing for rhetorical strategies and techniques in order to employ them in their own writing

-Create and sustain arguments, interpretations, and reflection based on readings, research, and/or personal experience

-Analyze the conventions of genre in order to write in a variety of modes

-Independently use the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry, drafting, revising, editing, and review

-Apply close-reading strategies to a nonfiction text of literary merit

-Use commas, parentheses, and dashes to set off nonrestrictive and parenthetical elements

-Recognize and correct lack of agreement between subjects and verbs

How will the students learn?

In this unit the following instructional strategies will be employed:

-OPTIC

-Paraphrasing

-Revising

-Summarizing

-Reading Discussion Groups

-Collaborative Discussions

 

How will students be assessed?

In this unit the following main assessments will be employed:

-Check Your Understanding

-Writing Prompts

Embedded Assessment One: Writing a Personal Essay

Embedded Assessment Two: Creating a Multi-Genre Research Project

-Unit Assessments

-Principles of Photography Assessments

-Independent Reading Logs

 

NOTE: Highlighted passages in this lesson plan indicate differentiation between AP Lang/HAmLit (yellow) and HAmLit/Film Studies (red) readings and activities.

 

MONDAY

·       Warm Up:

-Students will take a brief review quiz based on their understanding of using the OPTIC graphic organizer to assess visual literacy.

-Students will complete Reading 9- Mark Twain “Corn Pone Opinions” in order to continue AP MC Practice.  Students will also receive the AP Contract today.

 

·       Work Session

-Students will read and annotate the description of the Hudson River painters on page 318 of the Springboard.  This material will be supplemented with a PowerPoint presentation on Thomas Cole and Asher Durand.

-Students will receive copies of the OPTIC graphic organizer.  This will be used in order to analyze the paintings The Oxbow by Thomas Cole and Kindred Spirits by Asher Durand.  Both paintings will be displayed on the front projector as the Springboard text offers only a b&w version of poor visual quality.

-Students will use a majority of class time completing the OPTIC, and using the attached blank copy paper to “copy” the visual style of Durand and Cole in their own version of the Hudson River painters.

·       Closing:

-Students will Think-Pair-Share in an in-class publishing activity.

 

TUESDAY-

 

·       Warm Up:

-As a class we will unpack and record the Learning Targets for activity 4.5 in the Springboard text.  Selected students will record and display these Learning Targets on the front board

 

 

·       Work Session

As a class we will review the annotations involved with the Setting a Purpose for Reading.  This information will also be posted on the front board.

Students will work independently to do first and second readings of “Depths of Solitude” by Tupac Shakur, “Remember” by Joy Harjo, and “A Light Exists in Spring” by Emily Dickinson.

Students will complete the text-dependent questions #1-7 on pages 322-325

Students that finish early will continue work on their independent reading novel and Reader Response Journal #7

 

·       Closing:

-Students will turn in completed work as they finish for today’s Exit Ticket

 

WEDNESDAY:

NOTE:  Due to the adjusted homeroom schedule, classes will be extremely short today and tomorrow.  Students will use the laptop cart to complete NoRedInk activities for the entirety of class.

 

THURSDAY:

NOTE:  Today is Early Release.  As such, classes are extremely short.  Students will work on remediated USATestPrep and individualized assignments using the provided laptops

 

 

FRIDAY:

·       Warm Up:

-Students will be taking CTLS #5 in the Betty Gray Computer Lab for the first half of this class

·       Opening:

-Students will review the book cover design assessment for Reader Response journal #6.

·       Work Session

– Students are given the option to work on their cover design, read their independent reading novel, or complete their individualized assignments in USATestPrep for the remainder of class.

·       Closing:

-Students will conclude desk-side grade conferences with the instructor during independent reading/project time today.

 

 

 

Preview Week 9: Unit 4, “The Pursuit of Happiness” 10/2 – 10/6

Teacher: Mr. Sager

Unit 4: The Pursuit of Happiness

Essential Question(s):

·       What does it mean to pursue happiness?

·       How can a writer use/manipulate genre conventions for effect?

Curriculum Standard(s):

Focus Standards:

L.11-12.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

RI.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

RI.11-12.9: Analyze eighteenth-and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.11-12.9b: Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]”).

 

Additional Standards Addressed:

RL.11-12.9; RI.11-12.1; RI.11-12.2; RI.11-12.3; RI.11-12.4; RI.11-12.5; RI.11-12.6; RI.11-12.9; W.11-12.1; W.11-12.2; W.11-12.4; W.11-12.9; W.11-12.10; SL.11-12.1a; L.11-12.2; L.11-12.3a; L.11-12.4a; L.11-12.5a; L.11-12.6

What are the students learning?

In this unit, students will:

-Analyze and interpret good writing for rhetorical strategies and techniques in order to employ them in their own writing

-Create and sustain arguments, interpretations, and reflection based on readings, research, and/or personal experience

-Analyze the conventions of genre in order to write in a variety of modes

-Independently use the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry, drafting, revising, editing, and review

-Apply close-reading strategies to a nonfiction text of literary merit

-Use commas, parentheses, and dashes to set off nonrestrictive and parenthetical elements

-Recognize and correct lack of agreement between subjects and verbs

How will the students learn?

In this unit the following instructional strategies will be employed:

-OPTIC

-Paraphrasing

-Revising

-Summarizing

-Reading Discussion Groups

-Collaborative Discussions

 

How will students be assessed?

In this unit the following main assessments will be employed:

-Check Your Understanding

-Writing Prompts

Embedded Assessment One: Writing a Personal Essay

Embedded Assessment Two: Creating a Multi-Genre Research Project

-Unit Assessments

-Principles of Photography Assessments

-Independent Reading Logs

 

NOTE: Highlighted passages in this lesson plan indicate differentiation between AP Lang/HAmLit (yellow) and HAmLit/Film Studies (red) readings and activities.

 

MONDAY

·       Warm Up:

-Students will receive the rubric from both Unit 1: Embedded Assessment #1 & Embedded Assessment #2

-Using the Post-writing Reflection graphic organizer, students will complete reflective writing.  This will be attached to the other documents and will form the “passport to revision” offered to remediate the given grade

·       Opening:

-Students will use their viewing guide to “The Queen of Versailles” to have a review discussion of the theme of materialism and its role in the American Dream.

 

·       Work Session

As a class we will be completing our screening of the 2002 documentary, “Queen of Versailles.”

Students will work independently to complete the topic tree graphic organizer

Students will randomly choose poker chips to find collaborative discussion groups

Students will record the rules and roles for Literature Circles

Students will engage in Literature Circles until the conclusion of class

·       Closing:

-Active listening notes from today’s class will be turned in to the Exit Ticket box at the conclusion of class.

 

TUESDAY-

 

·       Warm Up:

-Students will complete Reading 7- (AP MC Practice) in the allotted fifteen minutes

-Students will complete a second reading of Understanding Movies, Chapter 3, section one.

 

·       Opening:

-Students will analyze motion as it exists in both Marcel DuChamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks at the Diner

-Students will chart MC Practice progress and complete annotations of three incorrect answers in Reading 6.  Students will also use their MC Review Guide to identify their dominant strategy for this section of the exam.

 

·       Work Session

§  Instruction (I do):

-Using Springboard online (projector), we will unpack the embedded assessment #1 for unit 4.  A chart paper organizer will be constructed by class volunteers to be posted on the main wall.

-Students will take notes on the assessment requirements.

§  Guided Practice (We do):

-Reflecting on what we have been discussing, the class will have a discussion about the first essential question (“what does it mean to pursue happiness”) as it relates to unit goals.

-Direct lecture- Students will take notes on American Transcendentalism and its historical/cultural context in American history.

-As a class we will discuss the learning targets, preview, and setting a purpose for reading sections of page 307 in the Springboard text.  Corresponding annotation directions will be referred to as recorded on the front whiteboard.

§  Independent Practice (You do):

-Students will form voluntary collaborative learning pairs in order to complete this portion of the lesson.

-Students will complete first and second readings of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay Self-Reliance (excerpt), while collaboratively annotating.

-Collaborative learning pairs will complete four corner responses corresponding to the four essential ideas of the essay, as indicated by the instructor.

·       Closing:

-Pairs will present one of their four corners to the instructor in micro-conferences conducted in the last twenty minutes of class.

 

WEDNESDAY:

·       Warm Up:

-Students will be shown the results of the last USATestPrep EOC practice (medium test)

-Individual assignments for USATestPrep will have been assigned for each student based on individual domain strengths.  Students are reminded of the deadline for this activity (October 18th).

·       Opening:

-Students are shown the book cover redesign requirements for Reading Journal #6.

-While students begin the design process for their book covers the instructor will meet with each student to read and assess Journal #5.

·       Work Session

-(Direct Lecture) Students will take notes on their provided spiderweb graphic organizer on the lives of both Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau

-We will focus on the characteristic of micro-cosmic writing by taking a brief walk to the field house and back

-Students will collect one leaf on the walk and are instructed to write a brief summary of their walk using descriptive language

-On the other side of their paper, students will tape their leaf and reflect on how the internal structure relates to the idea of choices an individual faces.

·       Closing:

-Students will read either side of their paper to at least three people, alternating sides each rotation.

-This reflective piece will be turned in to the instructor at the conclusion of class

 

THURSDAY:

·       Warm Up:

-As a class we will be discussing the use of TP-CASTT in order to analyze poetry and song lyrics.

-As a class we will practice the use of this as the song listens to and annotates the lyrics to “Society” by Eddie Vedder

·       Opening:

-On the reverse side of the TP-CASTT graphic organizer they were given, students will analyze “In the Depths of Solitude” by Tupac Shakur on page 321 of their Springboard text.

-This activity works as a transition for today’s reading of the excerpt from Walden by Henry David Thoreau.

 

 

·       Work Session

– As a class we will review the reading for a purpose requirements for annotation.  These are the same instructions posted on the whiteboard for yesterday’s reading of Emerson.

-The instructor will lead a popcorn first read of “Where I Lived and What I Lived For” by Henry David Thoreau (Walden excerpt)

-Students will independently conduct a second read while annotating the text

-Students will complete the text-dependent questions, #5-8 on page 313 of their Springboard text

·       Closing:

-Students will concurrently have desk-side grade conferences with the instructor, and will turn in today’s work as their formative assessment

 

FRIDAY:

·       Warm Up:

-Students will be taking CTLS #5 in the Betty Gray Computer Lab for the first half of this class

·       Opening:

-Students will review the book cover design assessment for Reader Response journal #6.

·       Work Session

– Students are given the option to work on their cover design, read their independent reading novel, or complete their individualized assignments in USATestPrep for the remainder of class.

·       Closing:

-Students will conclude desk-side grade conferences with the instructor during independent reading/project time today.

 

 

 

EMBEDDED ASSESSMENT 2: Synthesizing the American Dream

Assignment (THIS IS DUE TO YOUR BLOG NO LATER THAN FRIDAY 9/29 BY 8AM)
Your assignment is to synthesize at least three to five sources and your own observations to defend, challenge, or qualify the statement that America still provides access to the American Dream. This question requires you to integrate a variety of sources (three to five) into a coherent, well-written argumentative essay. Your argument should be central; the sources and your observations should support this argument.

Planning and Prewriting

■ What are the elements of a strong synthesis paper, and how can you use these elements as a sort of “To Do list” for your planning?

■ What texts from this unit provide relevant evidence for your own answer to the essay prompt?

Drafting

■ How will you clearly voice your position on the topic without overlooking the nuances and complexities of the topic?

■ What assumptions or beliefs are either spoken or unspoken in your sources?

■ How do the ideas in your selected sources relate to your position? Do they agree, disagree, or offer a sort of qualification to your ideas?

Evaluating and Revising

■ Do you consistently show how each selected quote from your sources relates to your central position?

■ How can you make sure that your syntax is sophisticated and varied, especially the openings of your sentences?

■ Are your ideas sequenced in the best way to guide your reader through your ideas and present a convincing argument? How could re-ordering some of your ideas improve this?

Editing and Publishing

■ How will you check for grammatical and technical accuracy?

■ What sort of outside resources can help you to check your draft (e.g., a style guide such as MLA, a dictionary)?

■ How will you prepare yourself to present this essay to an audience?

Scoring Guide

 

Scoring Criteria

Exemplary

Proficient

Emerging

Incomplete

Ideas

The essay

  • effectively synthesizes sources to defend, challenge, or qualify the central claim of the prompt

  • provides a strong thesis that anticipates audience needs

  • uses convincing, thorough, and relevant evidence

  • acknowledges and refutes counterclaims fairly and thoroughly.

The essay

  • adequately synthesizes sources to defend, challenge, or qualify the central claim of the prompt

  • provides a straightforward thesis that briefly contextualizes the issue

  • uses support that clearly connects the various source materials to the writer’s position.

The essay

  • attempts to synthesize sources but inadequately defends, challenges, or qualifies the central claim of the prompt

  • provides a thesis that attempts to contextualize the issue

  • uses support that connects the source material but with lapses in accuracy or completeness.

The essay

  • tries to synthesize sources but does not defend, challenge, or qualify the claim of the prompt

  • includes a weak thesis or one that is lost in a summary of sources

  • includes support that paraphrases source material with no commentary or analysis.

Structure

The essay

  • is organized to effectively reinforce the ideas of the argument

  • moves smoothly with successful use of transitions that enhance coherence

  • concludes by going beyond a summary of the thesis by illuminating how the writers’ positions will continue to influence the reader.

The essay

  • is organized to support the ideas of the argument

  • arranges ideas so they are easy to follow, using transitions to move between ideas

  • includes a conclusion that is logical yet may be somewhat repetitive to the thesis.

The essay

  • follows a simplistic organization with lapses in structure or coherence

  • arranges ideas in a confusing way and with an inconsistent use of transitions

  • includes a conclusion that may be logical yet is too close to the original thesis.

The essay

  • shows a lack of organization that detracts from argument, making the ideas difficult to follow

  • may jump too rapidly between ideas and lack transitions

  • includes a conclusion that returns directly to the attempted thesis.

Use of Language

The essay

  • demonstrates a mature style that advances the writer’s ideas

  • employs precise diction and skillful use of syntax, with keen attention to varied sentence openings, which helps to create a convincing voice

  • follows standard writing conventions (including accurate citation of sources).

The essay

  • demonstrates a style that adequately supports the writer’s ideas

  • uses logical diction and syntax, with some attention to varied sentence openings, creating a suitable voice

  • largely follows standard writing conventions (including accurate citation of sources); errors do not seriously impede readability.

The essay

  • demonstrates an inconsistent style that minimally supports the writer’s idea

  • unevenly uses diction and syntax to convey a suitable voice, with few varied sentence openings

  • contains errors in standard writing conventions that may impede readability; some sources are inaccurately cited.

The essay

  • demonstrates a limited style that ineffectively supports the writer’s ideas

  • contains lapses in diction or syntax that may not allow a suitable voice to sustain throughout the essay; sentence openings may be repetitive

  • contains errors that impede readability; sources may be inaccurately cited.

Preview Week 8: 9/18 – 8/22

This is our last week before Fall Break.  As you will be completing Unit 1: Embedded Assessment #2 over break, our readings and exercises this week are to provide the resources you will need to complete this major assignment.

MONDAY: (I am absent today, but all work should be turned in to Mr. Ford)

-Today you will be completing Reading 7 in our continued efforts to practice multiple choice questions for the AP exam.

-You will be reading two selections for today’s work: “Money” (poem) and an excerpt from “A Raisin in the Sun” (dramatic fiction).

-You’ll complete text-dependent questions in your Springboard text in response to these selections.

TUESDAY:

-Today we will have out Socratic Seminar, entitled “The American Dream and Citizen Kane.”  We will be using the Fishbowl format for this seminar.  I will be explaining and modeling the various roles in this type of seminar in order for you to conduct these independently in the coming unit.

WEDNESDAY:

-We will be taking the CTLS #4 assessment today.  We’ll take advantage of the use of in-class technology to complete the Illustrated Quotation assessment.  In this assessment you will choose five quotations about money (found in Springboard) and research iconic images that represent the meaning in these quotes.  Images will be displayed in your blogs with explanation.

-You will also be sending me five iconic images that define your understanding of the American Dream.  These images will be retained for tomorrow’s opening discussion.

THURSDAY:

-Since a majority of the class will be on the field trip tomorrow, I’d like to dedicate the majority of today’s class discussing the AP portion of this course.  We’ll be having a digital scavenger hunt to discuss the various digital tutoring resources for the exam, as well as exploring the benefits of taking AP courses and, finally, how to register for the exam.

-We’ll be discussing the AP contract, as well as final exam exemptions.  I will be providing you a list of print resources and local tutoring services to best prepare for the exam.

-Finally, we’ll discuss some field trip rules and expectations.  As I have done this specific trip once before, I have some important tips you should follow as we hopefully enjoy a beautiful day in the Marietta Square.

FRIDAY:

-We will end our week exploring the John Root Home and Garden Museum on the Marietta Square.  I hope the weather cooperates as we explore this fascinating look at 19th century American life.  We’ll start the day in the park and move through our guided tours in the morning.  You will have time to explore lunch on your own, but are expected to reconvene promptly at 1:15 PM at the bus so that we may return by our scheduled time.  I hope you enjoy this trip, cited as the most popular activity  we did last year.

-You will be completing Embedded Assessment #2 over Fall Break.  You should have a ton of resources to draw from.

HAVE AN EXCELLENT FALL BREAK!!

 

Preview Week 6: 9/4 – 9/8

 

MONDAY:

NOTE- Labor Day- School Holiday

TUESDAY:

·       Warm Up:

-As a class we will review the results of the PollAnywhere.com survey students took last week.  This survey can be found on page 65 of Springboard.

·       Opening:

-As a class we will review the Learning Target and Setting a Purpose For Reading found on page 64 of Springboard.

-Students will use Metacognitive Markers to annotate today’s text during the first and second reading.

·       Work Session

(I Do…)

-The instructor will conduct the first reading of “Is the American Dream Still Possible” by David Wallechinsky

-As the instructor reads, students will annotate the text

-The instructor will additionally model the SOAPSTone graphic organizer that students will turn in with their text-dependent questions at the conclusion of class.

(We Do…)

-The instructor will outline the grade conferences/annotation assignment that will be done during the Second Reading and Text-Dependent questions portion of the Work Session

(You Do…)

-Students will work independently to complete their Second Reading and text-dependent questions

-As students conduct their Second Reading they will complete the SOAPSTone graphic organizer

WEDNESDAY:

·       Warm Up:

-Students will receive a handout on transitions and will complete the Practice activity on page 68 of Springboard

·       Opening:

-On the reverse of this handout, students will complete the chart in which they will identify the claim, supporting evidence, stylistic choices, and transitions in yesterday’s text “Is the American Dream Still Possible” by David Wallechesky

·       Work Session

§  Instruction (I do):

-As a class we will review the Learning Targets and Setting a Purpose for Reading on page 69 of Springboard

-Students are encouraged to use Metacognitive Markers as they complete the Second Reading of the Text

-The instructor will conduct the First Reading of “The Declaration of Independence” on pages 69-72 in Springboard

§  Guided Practice (We do):

-Students will work with one collaborative learning partner to complete the chart on page 73 of Springboard

-Students will receive chart paper and supplies to complete the task

§  Independent Practice (You do):

-Students that finish early will begin the text-dependent questions on page 72.

·       Closing:

-Students will conduct a Gallery Walk of completed charts at the end of class, gathering resources for the Second Embedded Assessment

THURSDAY:

·       Warm Up:

-In order to introduce the material to be used in Film Studies today, students will freewrite about the movement they see in two separate paintings (Guernica by Pablo Picasso and No.5 by Jackson Pollack

·       Opening:

-Students will use the OPTIC graphic organizer to analyze two additional paintings

-Students will receive the handout on “Movement in Film” from chapter two of Understanding Movies by Louis Gianetti

-Students will be given time to highlight important vocabulary and explore the associated Quizlet study set for this week’s academic vocabulary

·       Work Session

(I Do…)

-As a class we will review and record the Learning Target and Setting a Purpose for Reading for today’s texts

-The instructor will model the use of the TP-CAST graphic organizer, which is located on the back of the OPTIC organizer

(We Do…)

-As a class we will conduct a First Reading of “Ellis Island” by Joseph Bruchac

-As a class we will fill out the first row of the TP-CAST organizer, in order to model independent work today

(You Do…)

-Independently, students will read and annotate the poems, “On Being Brought from Africa to America” by Phillis Wheatley and “Europe and America” by David Ignatow while working on the TP-CAST organizer

-Students that finish early will start their completion of the text-dependent questions on page 78

·       Closing:

-Students will meet with the instructor, concurrently, during the work session for a grade conference and to discuss the third Reader’s Response journal entry from last week

FRIDAY (Independent Reading and Film Studies Friday):

·       Warm Up:

-As a class we will view and discuss the framing choices different directors make to introduce their subject.

-We will also view selected clips from “Diabolique,” “Rear Window,” and “Shadows and Fog” to discuss visual tone.

 

·       Opening:

-Students will receive the packet for Mis En Scene.

-Students are given time to underline/highlight the Preview for this material (attached to the cover)

·       Work Session

§  Instruction (I do):

– Students will be given the journal entry (Reader’s Response #4) for this week’s independent reading

 

§  Guided Practice (We do):

-The class will be in the Media Center this day for independent reading

-Students that have individualized activities as a result of the CTLS assessment on USATestPrep to work on while the instructor completes the individual grade conferences.

 

§  Independent Practice (You do):

-Students will read independently and begin work on their fourth reading journal passage.

·       Closing:

–          Students will choose one scene from what we watched an analysis of the mis-en-scene.  This will serve as today’s Exit Ticket.